the weblog of Alan Knox

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Trouble with Tribbles… and Greek Fonts

Posted by on Jun 24, 2011 in personal, translation | 7 comments

Trouble with Tribbles… and Greek Fonts

So, first, I love Star Trek. When I was thinking of a title for this post, I thought of “Trouble with Greek Fonts.” As I typed that title, it automatically came out as “Trouble with Tribbles,” so I left it.

For this post, do not think of “tribbles” as those balls of fur that multiplied faster than rabbits on board the USS Enterprise. Instead, think of “tribbles” as the weird, gibberish characters that you see if you look at any of my older posts that included Greek fonts. So, for this post, “tribbles” look something like this: ἐπορεύθησαν

(If you don’t understand the Star Trek reference, and you want to know what I’m talking about, then you can check this article.)

Second… my site has been inundated with tribbles. Wanna see a slew of tribbles? Just look at this post or almost any of my posts in the “translation” category.

Apparently this happened during a database upgrade a few months ago. But, since it only affected the Greek fonts on my site and a few other special characters, I didn’t notice it until it was too late. (Yes, I always back up my database, but I did not want to restore a month or more worth of new posts to the backup.)

So, what should I do? Should I go back and fix all of the posts with Greek fonts? Some of them are the most popular posts on my site, but there are alot of them. I decided not to try to fix all of those Greek fonts. I’m going to leave the tribbles as they are.

Instead, I’m going to rewrite alot of those older posts. (Yes, there are some newer posts with Greek fonts too, and I’ll decide what to do with those later.) Many of those older posts need to be rewritten anyway. So, I’m not going to rewrite them word for word. Instead, I’m going to write new posts about the same subjects.

In the next few weeks, if you think you’re reading an older post, there are two ways you will be able to tell if the post is new or old: 1) Check the date, and 2) only the new posts have thumbnail images attached to them.

Meanwhile, if you like tribbles, you’re welcomed to occasionally stroll through the “translations” posts or other older posts with Greek fonts. I’m sure the tribbles would love the company.

Where should we put the “one another”?

Posted by on Aug 17, 2010 in edification, gathering, scripture, translation | 12 comments

Where should we put the “one another”?

Today, Danny (from “learning…“) reminded me (via email) of a discussion that we’ve had about Hebrews 10:24-25… specifically the beginning of Hebrews 10:24.

You see, in the Greek text, the word translated “one another” is with the subjunctive (command) “Let us consider”. But, it is almost always translated with the infinitive (“to stir up”).

So, the ESV (and most other translations), produce something like this:

And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works… (Hebrews 10:24 ESV)

But, I prefer something like this:

And let us consider one another to stir up love and good works… (Hebrews 10:24)

Do you see the difference? Is there a difference in interpretation in the two different translations? Does it matter where we put the “one another” in this verse?

Ruth 1:19-22 LXX translation

Posted by on Jun 26, 2010 in translation | Comments Off

Ruth 1:19-22 LXX translation

My translation:

Both of them traveled until they came to Bethlehem. Everyone in the city cried out, “Is this Naomi?”

She said to them, “Do not call me ‘Naomi.’ Call me ‘Bitter,’ because the greatest one made me bitter. I went out full, and the Lord returned me empty. Why call me ‘Naomi’? The Lord made me low, and the great one harmed me.”

So, Naomi and her daughter-in-law Ruth, the Moabitess, returned leaving the region of Moab behind, and they arrived in Bethlehem at the beginning of the barley harvest. (Ruth 1:19-22)

Greek Text:

ἐπορεύθησαν δὲ ἀμφότεραι ἕως τοῦ παραγενέσθαι αὐτὰς εἰς βαιθλεεμ καὶ ἤχησεν πᾶσα ἡ πόλις ἐπ’ αὐταῖς καὶ εἶπον αὕτη ἐστὶν νωεμιν καὶ εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτάς μὴ δὴ καλεῖτέ με νωεμιν καλέσατέ με πικράν ὅτι ἐπικράνθη ἐν ἐμοὶ ὁ ἱκανὸς σφόδρα ἐγὼ πλήρης ἐπορεύθην καὶ κενὴν ἀπέστρεψέν με ὁ κύριος καὶ ἵνα Ï„á½· καλεῖτέ με νωεμιν καὶ κύριος ἐταπείνωσέν με καὶ ὁ ἱκανὸς ἐκάκωσέν με καὶ ἐπέστρεψεν νωεμιν καὶ Ρουθ ἡ μωαβῖτις ἡ νύμφη αὐτῆς ἐπιστρέφουσα ἐξ ἀγροῦ *μωαβ αὐταὶ δὲ παρεγενήθησαν εἰς βαιθλεεμ ἐν ἀρχῇ θερισμοῦ κριθῶν

Here is another translation for comparison (Brenton’s Translation):

And they went both of them until they came to Bethleem: and it came to pass, when they arrived at Bethleem, that all the city rang with them, and they said, Is this Noemin? And she said to them, Nay, do not call me Noemin; call me ‘Bitter,’ for the Mighty One has dealt very bitterly with me. I went out full, and the Lord has brought me back empty: and why call ye me Noemin, whereas the Lord has humbled me and the Mighty One has afflicted me? So Noemin and Ruth the Moabitess, her daughter-in-law, returned from the country of Moab; and they came to Bethleem in the beginning of barley harvest.

And, finally, here is an English translation of the Hebrew text:

So the two of them went on until they came to Bethlehem. And when they came to Bethlehem, the whole town was stirred because of them. And the women said, “Is this Naomi?” She said to them, “Do not call me Naomi; call me Mara, for the Almighty has dealt very bitterly with me. I went away full, and the LORD has brought me back empty. Why call me Naomi, when the LORD has testified against me and the Almighty has brought calamity upon me?” So Naomi returned, and Ruth the Moabite her daughter-in-law with her, who returned from the country of Moab. And they came to Bethlehem at the beginning of barley harvest. (Ruth 1:19-22 ESV)

Ruth 1:14-18 LXX translation

Posted by on Jun 19, 2010 in translation | Comments Off

Ruth 1:14-18 LXX translation

My translation:

They cried and cried. Then Orpah kissed her mother-in-law and went back to her family. But Ruth followed Naomi.

Naomi said to Ruth, “Don’t you see that your sister-in-law has returned to her family and to her gods. Now, you also turn back with your sister-in-law.”

But Ruth said, “Do not ask me to leave you or to turn my back on you, because wherever you go, I will go. Wherever you stay, I will stay. Your family is my family. Your God is my God. Wherever you die, I will die, and I will be buried in that same place. May the Lord do this – and more than this – because only death will separate me from you.”

When Naomi saw that she was determined to go with her, she did not speak to her about it again. (Ruth 1:14-18)

Greek Text:

καὶ ἐπῆραν τὴν φωνὴν αὐτῶν καὶ ἔκλαυσαν ἔτι καὶ κατεφίλησεν Oρφα τὴν πενθερὰν αὐτῆς καὶ ἐπέστρεψεν εἰς τὸν λαὸν αὐτῆς Ρουθ δὲ ἠκολούθησεν αὐτῇ καὶ εἶπεν νωεμιν πρὸς Ρουθ ἰδοὺ ἀνέστρεψεν ἡ σύννυμφός σου πρὸς λαὸν αὐτῆς καὶ πρὸς τοὺς θεοὺς αὐτῆς ἐπιστράφητι δὴ καὶ σὺ ὀπίσω τῆς συννύμφου σου εἶπεν δὲ Ρουθ μὴ ἀπαντήσαι ἐμοὶ τοῦ καταλιπεῖν σε á¼¢ ἀποστρέψαι ὄπισθέν σου ὅτι σὺ ὅπου ἐὰν πορευθῇς πορεύσομαι καὶ οὗ ἐὰν αὐλισθῇς αὐλισθήσομαι ὁ λαός σου λαός μου καὶ ὁ θεός σου θεός μου καὶ οὗ ἐὰν ἀποθάνῃς ἀποθανοῦμαι κἀκεῖ ταφήσομαι τάδε ποιήσαι μοι κύριος καὶ τάδε προσθείη ὅτι θάνατος διαστελεῖ ἀνὰ μέσον ἐμοῦ καὶ σοῦ ἰδοῦσα δὲ νωεμιν ὅτι κραταιοῦται αὐτὴ τοῦ πορεύεσθαι μετ’ αὐτῆς ἐκόπασεν τοῦ λαλῆσαι πρὸς αὐτὴν ἔτι

Here is another translation for comparison (Brenton’s Translation):

And they lifted up their voice, and wept again; and Orpha kissed her mother-in-law and returned to her people; but Ruth followed her. And Noemin said to Ruth, Behold, thy sister-in-law has returned to her people and to her gods; turn now thou also after thy sister-in-law. And Ruth said, Intreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following thee; for whithersoever thou goest, I will go, and wheresoever thou lodgest, I will lodge; thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God. And wherever thou diest, I will die, and there will I be buried: the Lord do so to me, and more also, if I leave thee, for death only shall divide between me and thee. And Noemin seeing that she was determined to go with her, ceased to speak to her any more.

And, finally, here is an English translation of the Hebrew text:

Then they lifted up their voices and wept again. And Orpah kissed her mother-in-law, but Ruth clung to her. And she said, “See, your sister-in-law has gone back to her people and to her gods; return after your sister-in-law.” But Ruth said, “Do not urge me to leave you or to return from following you. For where you go I will go, and where you lodge I will lodge. Your people shall be my people, and your God my God. Where you die I will die, and there will I be buried. May the LORD do so to me and more also if anything but death parts me from you.” And when Naomi saw that she was determined to go with her, she said no more. (Ruth 1:14-18 ESV)

Ruth 1:7-13 LXX translation

Posted by on Jun 12, 2010 in translation | Comments Off

Ruth 1:7-13 LXX translation

My translation:

She left the place where she had lived with her two daughters-in-law, and they traveled along the road that led to Judah. Naomi said to her daughters-in-law, “Each of you return to your mother’s house. May the Lord grant you mercy, just as you have granted mercy to my dead sons and to me. May the Lord give each of you a resting place in a husband’s house.” She kissed them, and they cried loudly.

The daughters-in-law said to her, “We are returning to your people with you.”

Naomi said, “Go back now, my daughters. Why go with me? Can I still give birth to sons who will become your husbands? Go back now, my daughters. I have grown too old to have another husband. But, if I could find a husband and give birth to sons, you would not wait for them to grow up, would you? Or would you refrain from marrying in order to wait for them? No, my daughters, this situation has made me bitter for your sakes, because the Lord is against me.” (Ruth 1:7-13)

Greek Text:

καὶ ἐξῆλθεν ἐκ τοῦ τόπου οὗ ἦν ἐκεῖ καὶ αἱ δύο νύμφαι αὐτῆς μετ’ αὐτῆς καὶ ἐπορεύοντο ἐν τῇ ὁδῷ τοῦ ἐπιστρέψαι εἰς τὴν γῆν Iουδα καὶ εἶπεν νωεμιν ταῖς νύμφαις αὐτῆς πορεύεσθε δὴ ἀποστράφητε ἑκάστη εἰς οἶκον μητρὸς αὐτῆς ποιήσαι κύριος μεθ’ ὑμῶν ἔλεος καθὼς ἐποιήσατε μετὰ τῶν τεθνηκότων καὶ μετ’ ἐμοῦ δῴη κύριος ὑμῖν καὶ εὕροιτε ἀνάπαυσιν ἑκάστη ἐν οἴκῳ ἀνδρὸς αὐτῆς καὶ κατεφίλησεν αὐτάς καὶ ἐπῆραν τὴν φωνὴν αὐτῶν καὶ ἔκλαυσαν καὶ εἶπαν αὐτῇ μετὰ σοῦ ἐπιστρέφομεν εἰς τὸν λαόν σου καὶ εἶπεν νωεμιν ἐπιστράφητε δή θυγατέρες μου καὶ ἵνα Ï„á½· πορεύεσθε μετ’ ἐμοῦ μὴ ἔτι μοι υἱοὶ ἐν τῇ κοιλίᾳ μου καὶ ἔσονται ὑμῖν εἰς ἄνδρας ἐπιστράφητε δή θυγατέρες μου διότι γεγήρακα τοῦ μὴ εἶναι ἀνδρί ὅτι εἶπα ὅτι ἔστιν μοι ὑπόστασις τοῦ γενηθῆναί με ἀνδρὶ καὶ τέξομαι υἱούς μὴ αὐτοὺς προσδέξεσθε ἕως οὗ ἁδρυνθῶσιν á¼¢ αὐτοῖς κατασχεθήσεσθε τοῦ μὴ γενέσθαι ἀνδρί μὴ δή θυγατέρες μου ὅτι ἐπικράνθη μοι ὑπὲρ ὑμᾶς ὅτι ἐξῆλθεν ἐν ἐμοὶ χεὶρ κυρίου

Here is another translation for comparison (Brenton’s Translation):

And she went forth out of the place where she was, and her two daughters-in-law with her: and they went by the way to return to the land of Juda. And Noemin said to her daughter-in-law, Go now, return each to the house of her mother: the Lord deal mercifully with you, as ye have dealt with the dead, and with me. The Lord grant you that ye may find rest each of you in the house of her husband: and she kissed them; and they lifted up their voice, and wept. And they said to her, We will return with thee to thy people. And Noemin said, Return now, my daughters; and why do ye go with me? have I yet sons in my womb to be your husbands? Turn now, my daughters, for I am too old to be married: for I said, Suppose I were married, and should bear sons; would ye wait for them till they should be grown? or would ye refrain from being married for their sakes? Not so, my daughters; for I am grieved for you, that the hand of the Lord has gone forth against me.

And, finally, here is an English translation of the Hebrew text:

So she set out from the place where she was with her two daughters-in-law, and they went on the way to return to the land of Judah. But Naomi said to her two daughters-in-law, “Go, return each of you to her mother’s house. May the LORD deal kindly with you, as you have dealt with the dead and with me. The LORD grant that you may find rest, each of you in the house of her husband!” Then she kissed them, and they lifted up their voices and wept. And they said to her, “No, we will return with you to your people.” But Naomi said, “Turn back, my daughters; why will you go with me? Have I yet sons in my womb that they may become your husbands? Turn back, my daughters; go your way, for I am too old to have a husband. If I should say I have hope, even if I should have a husband this night and should bear sons, would you therefore wait till they were grown? Would you therefore refrain from marrying? No, my daughters, for it is exceedingly bitter to me for your sake that the hand of the LORD has gone out against me.” (Ruth 1:7-13 ESV)

Ruth 1:1-6 LXX translation

Posted by on Jun 5, 2010 in translation | Comments Off

Ruth 1:1-6 LXX translation

My translation:

This story took place during the time when judges led Israel. There was a famine in that land. A man emigrated from Bethlehem in Judea to the foreign land of Moab. His wife and his sons went with him. The man’s name was Abimelech. His wife was Naomi, and his sons were Mahlon and Chilion. Even though they were all Ephrathites from Bethlehem in Judea, they came to the country of Moab and stayed there.

Abimelech, Naomi’s husband, died, and she was left behind with her two sons. They married two women from Moab named Orpha and Ruth. They lived in Moab for ten years. Then both Mahlon and Chilion died. Naomi was left behind by her husband and her two sons. Finally, Naomi decided to return from the land of Moab with her two daughters-in-law, because the Lord had taken care of his people in Israel by providing food for them. (Ruth 1:1-6)

Greek Text:

καὶ ἐγένετο ἐν τῷ κρίνειν τοὺς κριτὰς καὶ ἐγένετο λιμὸς ἐν τῇ γῇ καὶ ἐπορεύθη ἀνὴρ ἀπὸ βαιθλεεμ τῆς Iουδα τοῦ παροικῆσαι ἐν ἀγρῷ μωαβ αὐτὸς καὶ ἡ γυνὴ αὐτοῦ καὶ οἱ υἱοὶ αὐτοῦ καὶ ὄνομα τῷ ἀνδρὶ Aβιμελεχ καὶ ὄνομα τῇ γυναικὶ αὐτοῦ νωεμιν καὶ ὄνομα τοῖς δυσὶν υἱοῖς αὐτοῦ μααλων καὶ χελαιων Eφραθαῖοι ἐκ βαιθλεεμ τῆς Iουδα καὶ ἤλθοσαν εἰς ἀγρὸν μωαβ καὶ ἦσαν ἐκεῖ καὶ ἀπέθανεν Aβιμελεχ ὁ ἀνὴρ τῆς νωεμιν καὶ κατελείφθη αὐτὴ καὶ οἱ δύο υἱοὶ αὐτῆς καὶ ἐλάβοσαν ἑαυτοῖς γυναῖκας μωαβίτιδας ὄνομα τῇ μιᾷ Oρφα καὶ ὄνομα τῇ δευτέρᾳ Ρουθ καὶ κατῴκησαν ἐκεῖ ὡς δέκα ἔτη καὶ ἀπέθανον καί γε ἀμφότεροι μααλων καὶ χελαιων καὶ κατελείφθη ἡ γυνὴ ἀπὸ τοῦ ἀνδρὸς αὐτῆς καὶ ἀπὸ τῶν δύο υἱῶν αὐτῆς καὶ ἀνέστη αὐτὴ καὶ αἱ δύο νύμφαι αὐτῆς καὶ ἀπέστρεψαν ἐξ ἀγροῦ μωαβ ὅτι ἤκουσαν ἐν ἀγρῷ μωαβ ὅτι ἐπέσκεπται κύριος τὸν λαὸν αὐτοῦ δοῦναι αὐτοῖς ἄρτους

Here is another translation for comparison (Brenton’s Translation):

And it came to pass when the judges ruled, that there was a famine in the land: and a man went from Bethleem Juda to sojourn in the land of Moab, he, and his wife, and his two sons. And the man’s name was Elimelech, and his wife’s name Noemin, and the names of his two sons Maalon and Chelaion, Ephrathites of Bethleem of Juda: and they came to the land of Moab, and remained there. And Elimelech the husband of Noemin died; and she was left, and her two sons. And they took to themselves wives, women of Moab; the name of the one was Orpha, and the name of the second Ruth; and they dwelt there about ten years. And both Maalon and Chelaion died also; and the woman was left of her husband and her two sons. And she rose up and her two daughters-in-law, and they returned out of the country of Moab, for she heard in the country of Moab that the Lord had visited his people to give them bread.

And, finally, here is an English translation of the Hebrew text:

In the days when the judges ruled there was a famine in the land, and a man of Bethlehem in Judah went to sojourn in the country of Moab, he and his wife and his two sons. The name of the man was Elimelech and the name of his wife Naomi, and the names of his two sons were Mahlon and Chilion. They were Ephrathites from Bethlehem in Judah. They went into the country of Moab and remained there. But Elimelech, the husband of Naomi, died, and she was left with her two sons. These took Moabite wives; the name of the one was Orpah and the name of the other Ruth. They lived there about ten years, and both Mahlon and Chilion died, so that the woman was left without her two sons and her husband. Then she arose with her daughters-in-law to return from the country of Moab, for she had heard in the fields of Moab that the LORD had visited his people and given them food. (Ruth 1:1-6 ESV)

Translating the LXX of Ruth

Posted by on Jun 3, 2010 in blog links, translation | Comments Off

Translating the LXX of Ruth

In a post published last Saturday, I finished translating Philippians. I’ve been trying to decide what to do next.

Dave Black keeps talking about his LXX class this fall, so I was thinking about translating something from the LXX… perhaps a few Psalms. But, today, he inspired me again.

It seems that the LXX class at SEBTS taught by Dave Black and Bob Cole will be translating Ruth from the LXX. So, that’s what I’m going to do next. I’m not taking the class, but I love the book and have never studied the LXX text of that book.

So, beginning this Saturday, I’ll publish posts of my translations from the LXX of Ruth. I’ll still try to translate paragraph by paragraph. (Anyone want to join me?)

Scripture… As We Live It #108

Posted by on May 30, 2010 in as we live it, translation | 1 comment

This is the 108th passage in “Scripture… As We Live It“:

For not only has the word of the Lord your “launch” plan sounded forth from you in Macedonia and Achaia, but your faith in God mass mailing has gone forth everywhere, so that we need not say anything. (1 Thessalonians 1:8 re-mix)

(Please read the first post for an explanation of this series.)

Philippians 4:15-23 translation

Posted by on May 29, 2010 in translation | Comments Off

My translation:

Now, indeed, you Philippians know that from the beginning of my gospel service, when I left Macedonia, no church shared with me in the matter of giving and receiving support except you alone. Even when I was in Thessalonica, you sent support several times to meet my needs. It’s not that I desire your gift, but I desire what is produced in your, which increases to your account. Now, I keep receiving enough in all things, and I keep overflowing in all things. I have been filled, because I received from Epaphroditus the gifts sent by you. It was a very sweet-smelling, acceptable offering which was pleasing to God. Now my God will fulfill every need you have according to his riches by the glory that is in Jesus Christ. May our God and Father be given the glory forever and ever, amen.

Greet everyone set apart in Jesus Christ for us. Your brothers and sisters who are with me send their greetings to you. All of those set apart in Jesus greet you, especially those who are part of Caesar’s family. May bhe grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit. (Philippians 4:15-23)

Greek Text:

Οἴδατε δὲ καὶ ὑμεῖς, Φιλιππήσιοι, ὅτι ἐν ἀρχῇ τοῦ εὐαγγελίου, ὅτε ἐξῆλθον ἀπὸ Μακεδονίας, οὐδεμία μοι ἐκκλησία ἐκοινώνησεν εἰς λόγον δόσεως καὶ λήμψεως εἰ μὴ ὑμεῖς μόνοι: ὅτι καὶ ἐν Θεσσαλονίκῃ καὶ ἅπαξ καὶ δὶς εἰς τὴν χρείαν μοι ἐπέμψατε. οὐχ ὅτι ἐπιζητῶ τὸ δόμα, ἀλλὰ ἐπιζητῶ τὸν καρπὸν τὸν πλεονάζοντα εἰς λόγον ὑμῶν. ἀπέχω δὲ πάντα καὶ περισσεύω: πεπλήρωμαι δεξάμενος παρὰ Ἐπαφροδίτου Ï„á½° παρ’ ὑμῶν, ὀσμὴν εὐωδίας, θυσίαν δεκτήν, εὐάρεστον Ï„á¿· θεῷ. ὁ δὲ θεός μου πληρώσει πᾶσαν χρείαν ὑμῶν κατὰ τὸ πλοῦτος αὐτοῦ ἐν δόξῃ ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ. Ï„á¿· δὲ θεῷ καὶ πατρὶ ἡμῶν ἡ δόξα εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας τῶν αἰώνων: ἀμήν. Ἀσπάσασθε πάντα ἅγιον ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ. ἀσπάζονται ὑμᾶς οἱ σὺν ἐμοὶ ἀδελφοί. ἀσπάζονται ὑμᾶς πάντες οἱ ἅγιοι, μάλιστα δὲ οἱ ἐκ τῆς Καίσαρος οἰκίας. ἡ χάρις τοῦ κυρίου Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ μετὰ τοῦ πνεύματος ὑμῶν.

Here is another translation for comparison:

And you Philippians yourselves know that in the beginning of the gospel, when I left Macedonia, no church entered into partnership with me in giving and receiving, except you only. Even in Thessalonica you sent me help for my needs once and again. Not that I seek the gift, but I seek the fruit that increases to your credit. I have received full payment, and more. I am well supplied, having received from Epaphroditus the gifts you sent, a fragrant offering, a sacrifice acceptable and pleasing to God. And my God will supply every need of yours according to his riches in glory in Christ Jesus. To our God and Father be glory forever and ever. Amen. Greet every saint in Christ Jesus. The brothers who are with me greet you. All the saints greet you, especially those of Caesar’s household. The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit. (Philippians 4:15-23 ESV)

Philippians 4:10-14 translation

Posted by on May 22, 2010 in translation | 1 comment

My translation:

Now, I rejoiced greatly in the Lord that now at last you renewed your concern for me. Actually, you continued to be concerned, but you lacked opportunity to act on that concern. It’s not that I speak about my need, because I learned to be content in whatever state I find myself. I know both how to live in poverty and also how to live in riches. In everything and in all ways, I have learned both while having plenty to eat and while going hungry, both while having all my needs met and while doing without. I am strengthened in all things by the one who empowers me. Nevertheless, you did well by participating in my troubles. (Philippians 4:10-14)

Greek Text:

Ἐχάρην δὲ ἐν κυρίῳ μεγάλως ὅτι ἤδη ποτὲ ἀνεθάλετε τὸ ὑπὲρ ἐμοῦ φρονεῖν, ἐφ’ ᾧ καὶ ἐφρονεῖτε ἠκαιρεῖσθε δέ. οὐχ ὅτι καθ’ ὑστέρησιν λέγω, ἐγὼ γὰρ ἔμαθον ἐν οἷς εἰμι αὐτάρκης εἶναι. οἶδα καὶ ταπεινοῦσθαι, οἶδα καὶ περισσεύειν: ἐν παντὶ καὶ ἐν πᾶσιν μεμύημαι καὶ χορτάζεσθαι καὶ πεινᾶν, καὶ περισσεύειν καὶ ὑστερεῖσθαι. πάντα ἰσχύω ἐν Ï„á¿· ἐνδυναμοῦντί με. πλὴν καλῶς ἐποιήσατε συγκοινωνήσαντές μου τῇ θλίψει.

Here is another translation for comparison:

I rejoiced in the Lord greatly that now at length you have revived your concern for me. You were indeed concerned for me, but you had no opportunity. Not that I am speaking of being in need, for I have learned in whatever situation I am to be content. I know how to be brought low, and I know how to abound. In any and every circumstance, I have learned the secret of facing plenty and hunger, abundance and need. I can do all things through him who strengthens me. Yet it was kind of you to share my trouble. (Philippians 4:10-14 ESV)