the weblog of Alan Knox

Fighting the War on Christmas… in Jesus’ Name, of course

Posted by on Dec 20, 2011 in blog links | 5 comments

Fighting the War on Christmas… in Jesus’ Name, of course

Skye at “Out of Ur” has written a very insightful article called “The Wrong War on Christmas.”

The article traces how Christians responded to Christmas only a hundred years ago (or so), and compares that to how Christians respond to Christmas today. (Of course, I’ve always said that Christians – Evangelicals in particular – have a short memory.) In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, many Christians did not accept Christmas as a “religious” holiday.

When did this change? When the American culture (society) began to accept Christmas more widely, then Christians and the church began to accept and celebrate it as well.

Today, many Christians fight to “keep the Christ in Christmas.” (I wonder how many are also keeping the “Mass” in Christmas…)

Anyway, the last part of Skye’s article should cause all of us to think… whether we celebrate Christmas or not:

Sadly, the “War on Christmas” and “Christmas Under Siege” campaigns pushed by some conservative Christians says more about the church’s captivity to consumerism than its commitment to the love of Christ and their neighbors.

Just something to think about…


5 Comments

Comments are closed. If you would like to discuss this post, send an email to alan [at] alanknox [dot] net.

  1. 12-20-2011

    I like to say that instead of keeping Christ in Christmas, we should keep Him in every day. I don’t think our over-emphasis on Christmas is healthy for the church (though I do love Christmas carols).

  2. 12-20-2011

    Bah humbug.

  3. 12-20-2011

    I’m not sure it matters what Christians believed about Christmas 100 years ago or just 50 years ago. It’s fine to hear what someone says they used to say, but I’m never quite sure if they are saying it all straight or picking and choosing. Believers of the past are not an authority on anything, regardless of how godly they were perceived to be. God’s Word is the authority today. What Paul says about special days, thinks linked to idolatry in the past, cultural or historical concerns – between one brother and another are always going to be debatable issues. He has instructions for us on all that. These are the instructions we should be talking about as we discuss the Christmas issue.

    I think Sky’s article makes some bogus assumptions and connections in his statements those who celebrate Christmas are tied into massive consumerism or anyone who wants to keep Christ a focal point of the holiday are misguided consumer pushers. I think it’s weak in substance.

  4. 12-21-2011

    Matt,

    I love Christmas carols too. I’m also still learning what it means to let Christ be Lord every day.

    James,

    Are you Scrooge, or am I? :)

    Tim,

    I think the point of Skye’s article is that many Christians fight for a traditional meaning of Christmas that is not all that traditional. From what I can tell, the modern version of “Christmas tradition” was popularized by Charles Dickens then Coca Cola / Norman Rockwell. Christmas festivities were mainly comprised of drunken revelry until then, and Christians tended to revile them. Once the American society bought into the new festivities and traditions, Christians followed along.

    -Alan

  5. 12-22-2011

    My though; a true conservative would not celebrate at all. How do you keep Christ in something that he was never in? Did Christ mandate a celebration of his birth? And if he did why would we celebrate the King of Creation’s quote “birthday” on a date that is known to be the birth date of many pagan deities. Christ did however tell us in his to remember His death AND Resurrection. OT Jeremiah 10 I believe, tells us that following the traditions of men is futile. Thanks for the post brother. Always good to sharpen our iron.