the weblog of Alan Knox

House on Old Testament Theology and Application

Posted by on Mar 4, 2010 in biblical theology | Comments Off

[A] few basic convictions have generally characterized Old Testament theology. First, it must have a historical base. Second, it must explain what the Old Testament itself claims, not what preconceived historical or theological systems impose upon the biblical material. Third, when part of Christians theology, as this book attempts to be, Old Testament theology must in some way address its relationship to the New Testament. Fourth, by joining with the New Testament to form biblical theology, Old Testament theology offers material that systematic theologians can divide into categories and topics for discussion. Fifth, by stating what the Old Testament says about God’s nature and will, Old Testament theology moves beyond description of truth into prescription for action. After all, if interpreters agree that the Old Testament teaches that God commands certain behavior, it seems evident that a description has discovered a norm. One may obey the normative command or not, but the fact that a norm has been uncovered remains unchanged. (Paul R. House, Old Testament Theology (Downers Grove: IVP, 1998), p. 53)