the weblog of Alan Knox

An enormous common ground

Posted by on Mar 9, 2010 in unity | 3 comments

In an unpublished letter to a friend, C.S. Lewis wrote the following:

When all is said (and truly said) about the divisions of Christendom, there remains, by God’s mercy, an enormous common ground.

Do you think that Christians today tend to focus on the “enormous common ground” or on the “divisions” (or distincitves)? Why do you think the focus is where it is? Do you think it is possible for believers to find unity in the “enormous common ground”? Why or why not? Should followers of Jesus Christ seek unity (true relational unity, not spiritual unity) in spite of differences? Why or why not?


3 Comments

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  1. 3-9-2010

    Do you think that Christians today tend to focus on the “enormous common ground” or on the “divisions” (or distinctives)?

    I think we tend to focus on the divisions. How many denominations are there?

    Why do you think the focus is where it is? PRIDE! Lack of servants heart.

    Do you think it is possible for believers to find unity in the “enormous common ground”?

    Yes, however it will take a complete paradigm change for
    the church to see herself as one.

    Should followers of Jesus Christ seek unity (true relational unity, not spiritual unity) in spite of differences?

    Absolutely. We are commanded to do so. Eph 4:1-6.

  2. 3-9-2010

    Should followers of Jesus Christ seek unity (true relational unity, not spiritual unity) in spite of differences?

    Yes (that’s the easy part of right).

    Then, you are confronted with an intransigent churchianity that suffocates the saints and blinds them to their great privileges of service (and responsibilities).

    Then, you are confronted with Christians you just don’t like, who have been mean, vain, arrogant, etc. (you know, like me, but that doesn’t count).

    In time, with His grace and mercy, you discover that evil can be overcome with good, that taking up your cross means letting go of so much that we think defines us (but instead, imprisons us).

    In time, you discover that being right isn’t the same as being obedient, that indulging in personal anger and revenge isn’t the same as serving the interests of our Glorious Savior.

    It is an amazing freedom to not have to defend or convince or resist. It is wonderful to be free to obey God and desire to know Him, rather than react to men and seek their approval.

    Or, not (that’s the easy part of wrong). We can just revel in fighting and devouring and winning and losing and competing and belittling.

  3. 3-10-2010

    Thanks for the comments guys. If we place this discussion in the context of Romans 14-15, I think believers today do a great job of “each one being convinced in his own mind” (Romans 14:5), but we’ve fallen short of “accepting one another as Christ has accepted us” (Romans 15:7).

    I agree that pride is an issue, but accepting one another in spite of our disagreements requires love and submission.

    -Alan